contact us

Use the form on the right to contact us.

You can edit the text in this area, and change where the contact form on the right submits to, by entering edit mode using the modes on the bottom right.

307 Research Dr
Durham, NC, 27705
United States

signphoto4.jpg

Lab Members

Scott Soderling Professor., PI.  

Scott Soderling
Professor., PI.

 

Scott H. Soderling, Ph.D.:  Dr. Soderling received his Ph.D. in Pharmacology at the Univ. of Washington.  As an HHMI postdoctoral fellow he uncovered a new neuronal cytoskeletal signaling complex implicated in intellectual disability that facilitates synaptogenesis.  He was recruited to Duke University in 2005.  Dr. Soderling also serves as the Director of Graduate Studies for Cell Biology and the Scientific Director of the Duke Mouse Transgenic Facility.

 

 

 

 

 

Akiyoshi Uezu Postdoctoral Fellow

Akiyoshi Uezu
Postdoctoral Fellow

Jamie Croucher MD/PhD student

Jamie Croucher
MD/PhD student

Yudong Gao Postdoctoral Fellow

Yudong Gao
Postdoctoral Fellow

Akiyoshi Uezu, M.D., Ph.D.: Dr. Uezu received his MD/Ph.D at Kumamoto University in Japan. Since joining the lab Dr. Uezu has pioneered the development of new proteomic approaches.  He has used these novel methods to identify the molecular complexes that mediate synaptic inhibition in vivo. 

 

 

 

 

 

Jamie Croucher, B.S. Biology (Haverford College): Jamie joined our lab in 2017 as part of the Medical Scientist Training Program of Duke Medical School. Jamie is interested in merging the biological mechanisms of neurodevelopmental disorders with her medical school training.  She is studying the molecular mechanisms that regulate inhibitory neuronal populations that are highly implicated in psychiatric disorders.

 

Yudong Gao, Ph.D.: Dr. Gao obtained his Ph.D. from the University of Tennessee Memphis and joined the lab in 2016.  Dr. Gao studies the molecular mechanisms of plasticity at inhibitory synapses.

Erin Spence Graduate Student

Erin Spence
Graduate Student

Erin Spence, B.S. Biology, B.A. Psychology (UNC): Erin joined our laboratory in the summer of 2013. She entered Duke through the Cell & Molecular Biology Program and was awarded an NIH Predoctoral Fellowship in 2015. Erin is working on mechanisms of early synaptogenesis. She uses a combination of ex vivo imaging, proteomics, and CRISPR-genome editing to understand how the actin cytoskeleton guides early excitatory synapse formation in the first weeks of life.

Tyler Bradshaw Graduate Student

Tyler Bradshaw
Graduate Student

Shataakshi Dube Graduate Student

Shataakshi Dube
Graduate Student

Patrick Devlin Research Technician

Patrick Devlin
Research Technician

 

Tyler BradshawB.S. Cell & Molecular Biology, (University of Washington): Tyler previously worked in our laboratory as a research technician before joining on as a graduate student through the Duke Neurobiology program.  As a technician, Tyler worked with Aki to develop a proteomic approach to identity inhibitory synaptic proteins.  As a graduate student he following up on this study by developing high-throughput functional screens to quantify mechanisms of inhibition relevant to epilepsy. 

 

Shataakshi DubeB.S. Biology, (Butler University): Shataakshi joined the lab in 2016 through the Neurobiology program.  She was recently awarded a fellowship to attend the Cold Spring Harbor course on Ion Channels and Synaptic Transmission and is now studying how actin remodeling modulates presynaptic properties.

 

Patrick DevlinB.S. Biology, (Davidson University): Patrick helps manage the lab mouse colony, which is no small task given we have almost 30 lines of mice!  He also works with Dr. Akiyoshi on projects related to new proteomic approaches to quantify in vivo synaptic complexes.  

Tetsuya Takano Postdoctoral Fellow

Tetsuya Takano
Postdoctoral Fellow

Eda Erata Graduate Student

Eda Erata
Graduate Student

Tetsuya Takano, Ph.D.: Tetsuya received his PhD from Tokyo Metropolitan University.  Dr. Takano is developing a novel in vivo BioID proteomic approach to investigate novel mechanisms of synaptic modulation in mice. 

 
 
 
 
 

Eda Erata, B.S. Molecular Biology & Genetics, (Sabanci University, Instanbul, Turkey): Eda joined our lab through the Duke PhD program in Cell and Molecular Biology.  She is using CRISPR-genome editing and in vivo BioID to tackle endogenous synaptic proteomes linked to Autism Spectrum Disorders.